Astronomy

Accelerating Plans To Go Back To The Moon

COD Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins First Light listeners each month for the Night Sky segment

COD Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins First Light listeners each month for the Night Sky segment

Each month on the First Sunday on First Light, College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins First Light host Brian O’Keefe for a discussion of astronomy, space news, and what back yard astronomers can expect to see in the night sky in the coming weeks. With the 50th anniversary of  Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon, Joe and Brian started their conversation this month with a discussion of stepped up plans to send people back to the lunar surface

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The First Ever Picture of A Black Hole

On the first Sunday of each month here at First Light, College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto stops by for a discussion of space news and to give backyard astronomers an idea of what there is to see in the night sky in the coming weeks. This month, First Light host Brian O’Keefe wanted to talk with Joe about a single, slightly fuzzy picture astronomers released to the public last month

This image by the Event Horizon Telescope project shows the event horizon of the supermassive black hole at the heart of the M87 galaxy. (Photo credit: EHT Collaboration)

This image by the Event Horizon Telescope project shows the event horizon of the supermassive black hole at the heart of the M87 galaxy. (Photo credit: EHT Collaboration)

Water on Mars and Wildflowers in California

New research suggests subsurface water could be responsible for seasonal errosion on Mars (photo courtesy of NASA.gov)

New research suggests subsurface water could be responsible for seasonal errosion on Mars (photo courtesy of NASA.gov)

College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins First Light host Brian O’Keefe on the first Sunday of each month. They discuss the latest discoveries and other space news, and give backyard astronomers an idea of what they can expect to see in the night sky in the coming weeks. This month, they started their conversation with a reminder of the amazing things astronauts can see from space

Massive wildflower bloom this spring in California was visible from the International Space Station (photo courtesy of NASA.gov)

Massive wildflower bloom this spring in California was visible from the International Space Station (photo courtesy of NASA.gov)

An Explanation of The Northern Lights

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Each month on the first Sunday, College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins First Light host Brian O’Keefe for a discussion of astronomy, space news, and to offer guidance for backyard astronomers. This month, Brian and Joe started their conversation with an explanation of the northern lights

A recent photo of the Aurora Borealis looked to some like a dragon descending from the sky (photo courtesty of NASA.gov)

A recent photo of the Aurora Borealis looked to some like a dragon descending from the sky
(photo courtesty of NASA.gov)

February's Night Sky

Image of Bedin-1, an ancient and little changed galaxy (image courtesy of NASA.gov)

Image of Bedin-1, an ancient and little changed galaxy (image courtesy of NASA.gov)

Every month on the first Sunday of the month, College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins First Light host Brian O’Keefe for a discussion of astronomy, space news, and what backyard astronomers can expect to see in the night sky over the next several weeks. This month’s conversation got started with questions about a fossil galaxy

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College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto offers a public talk about the Hubble Space telescope next Saturday night (February 9) at COD

College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto offers a public talk about the Hubble Space telescope next Saturday night (February 9) at COD

Adler Turns Its Attention To The Moon

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Did you brave the cold, last Sunday night to watch as the Earth’s shadow passed over the moon eventually creating an eerie red color on what is typically a bright white light in the night sky? Just days before that lunar eclipse, Chicago’s Adler Planetarium debuted a new show all about the moon. First Light host Brian O’Keefe traveled down to the lakefront museum this week to get a sense of this new show and to talk with Astronomer Mark Hammergren

Astronomer Mark Hammergren stands in front of a new moon globe at the Adler Planetarium. This view gives visitors a look at the far side of the moon.

Astronomer Mark Hammergren stands in front of a new moon globe at the Adler Planetarium. This view gives visitors a look at the far side of the moon.

A detailed look of the moon, as we see it from Earth on Adler Planetarium’s new moon globe

A detailed look of the moon, as we see it from Earth on Adler Planetarium’s new moon globe

The Mission of Two Explorers Comes To an End

Each month, on the first Sunday, College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins First Light host Brian O’Keefe for a discussion of what backyard astronomers can expect to see in the night sky. Joe and Brian also take some time to talk about the latest space news.

The Mars rover Opportunity stopped responding to communication from NASA, a massive dust storm likely coated the rover’s solar panels and ended its ability to generate power

The Mars rover Opportunity stopped responding to communication from NASA, a massive dust storm likely coated the rover’s solar panels and ended its ability to generate power

The Kepler Space Telescope mission came to an end after nine years of looking for planets outside our solar system

The Kepler Space Telescope mission came to an end after nine years of looking for planets outside our solar system

September's Night Sky

Every month, on the first Sunday of the month at First Light, College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins host Brian O'Keefe for a discussion of what you can expect to see in the night sky in the coming month. Joe and Brian also spend some of their time together to discuss discoveries and new developments in the realm of space science

College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins First Light host Brian O'Keefe each month to discuss space science and what there is to see in the night sky

College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins First Light host Brian O'Keefe each month to discuss space science and what there is to see in the night sky

A Japanese space probe is set to land on the asteroid Itokawa in early October. College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto discusses why this piece of rock could say a lot about the early Solar System.

A Japanese space probe is set to land on the asteroid Itokawa in early October. College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto discusses why this piece of rock could say a lot about the early Solar System.

Mars Takes Center Stage in July's Night Sky

For the first Sunday of each month on First Light, College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto joins Brian O'Keefe for a discussion of the wonders you can expect to see in the night sky over the next several weeks. Brian and Joe also take time to talk a little about the science of astronomy…recent discoveries and expected explorations

College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto

College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto

COD Professor Explains 'Exoplanets'

About once a month, here at First Light host Brian O'Keefe spends some time tilting his head back to look up at the night sky with College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe
DalSanto. This month they got started on this Super Bowl Sunday with conversation about last week’s Super Blue Blood moon.

image courtesy of NASA.gov

image courtesy of NASA.gov

Rare Back-to-Back Meteors Light The Sky

Tuesday night, a meteor lit up the night sky over southeast Michigan. Then Wednesday night a second space rock streaked across the sky in northern Indiana. First Light host Brian O'Keefe talked about the unusual back-to-back events with College of DuPage Astronomy professor Joe DalSanto.

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